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20121226
20130103
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was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" if any of us had a moment where arnold palmer says to us "would you like a little advice?" it would probably be like the winds calmed. "jim," he said. "you are not good enough to get mad." [laughter] that is reason enough to give this metal to mr. palmer, for giving the greatest golfing device ever. in his home, he has a table with coins for every championship he has won. there is an empty spot. he said, you never know when you'll have another claim to fill up one of those spots. mr. palmer, this is your day. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentleman, united states senator from the state of pennsylvania, the honorable patrick toomey. >> good morning and welcome to our guest of honor. we all know that's arnold palmer is a man of exceptional talent and succe
, jim, and i had a chance to visit troops in afghanistan on three separate occasions, meeting them in challah halls, carriers, and helicopters, those enthusiastic young men and women yet to be born when neil walked on the moon were mesmerized by his presence. in a typical neil fashion, he would always walk in, introduce himself, as if they did not know who he was, shaked each and every hand, and he would always give them, "hey. how are you guys doing?" as one increase of the marine, "mr. armstrong, why are you here?" neil's thoughtful and sincerely honest reply was "because you are here." he was special to these young kids and to a few older ones, as well. deeply proud to be a navy aviator, as a civilian at the time he flew, neil never received his astronaut wings. it was a tradition of those in the military. it was on the uss eisenhower back on 2010 on our way to afghanistan that we finally received -- that he'd received the tribute that he deserved. his visibly, visibly moved response said it all, and i quote, "i have never been more proud than when i earned my navy wings of gold
is a member of the jury and a climate scientist in his own right at lawrence livermore lab. >> jim, you and steve were pioneers of the frontiers of climate science, exploring the role of the oceans in climate change, the role of clouds, the role of aerosol particles, and i could spend a lot of time recounting your scientific contributions. i won't -- i just wanna tell you one very brief story. back in 1988, i was doing my postdoc in hamburg, you testified in front of congress. you said, we see the signal emerging from the noise. that had huge influence on me and on hundreds, thousands of my colleagues. the idea that we could see some coherent human-caused warming signal emerging from the year- to-year or decade-to-decade noise of natural climate variability, it certainly had a discernable influence on my career and on the science i chose to do. germans have a word, zivilcourage, there's not really an english translation for it. and what it means as best as i can translate it is, individuals who show extraordinary courage, not in the extraordinary circumstances of war, but in the extraor
on, he took on as his target, the speaker jim wright. that was the beginning of some of this polarization. it was a better time. since those last couple of decades, the institution has suffered from too much partisanship. >> before mr. gingrich, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' vo
nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running against professor moynihan. jim buckley is referring to you as professor moynihan. pat said, the mudslinging has begun. [laughter] what you are in for tonight, however, it is a lecture on political philosophy. take notes, there will be a test. in 1953, the year in which the words "under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which he said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is t
honor you. and then, finally, we're also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim, as we all know, jim webb came here, did something very few freshmen can do by getting a major new piece of legislation passed, the new g.i. bill, and on the committee he's been really critical to our thinking about the far east. he was the first american to visit burma in ten years, and i'm proud to say i think i may have been the one who was there before that, but he changed the policy, he knew we had to lift the sanctions and move it, and his contribution to thinking about the trans-pacific partnership, the continued efforts on vietnam mias has been a superb contribution. he's a great thinker, and we appreciate his service. and jim demint, jim demint and i have, obviously, disagreed on a number of treaties and initiatives in front of the committee, bun of the great things about -- but one of the great things about jim demint is you know where he stands. he knows what he believes, we do. he's been a terrific advocate for his point of view, and we're confident that in his, in the new hat that he's g
on for years in iowa. my former colleague, jim leach and i had written about that. it is happening in california, arizona, and even a little in florida. that is part of the problem, because democrats, nationally, got more than 1 million more votes than republicans who ran for the house of representatives. yet they come into this with a 35-vote margin. there are some areas where in north carolina there were more votes for democrats than republicans, but there are only 27% of the representatives are democrats. that is part of the problem. it confuses the notion about mandates. after all, the allwon decisively. -- the president won decisively. the senate pickup ground. it does not sound like much of a national mandate to continue the policies of the republicans over the last decade or so. host: david is our next caller in ohio, republican. caller: good morning. being a regular person on a budget, i can only get the things i can pay for. i would love to be able to buy erraris or newr ou houses or all kinds of things they would love to have. due to my budget, i am not able to do that. t
, jim. caller: i'm calling from georgetown, texas. senator schumer proposed a $1 million cut off. reid and durbin did not go along with that. no entitlement cuts and we have $16 chilean debt and everybody -- $16 trillion debt and everybody keeps spending. don't we have to pay this debt down? host: the debt is $16.3 tr illion. another looming deadline. the treasury department can extend the deadline for the next month or two. part of the dynamics in the negotiations. front page of "the washington times." is the brink" cutline. host: harry reid had this to say on the senate floor. [video clip] >> the american people do not understand. the house is operating without the house of representatives. it is being operated with a dictatorship by the speaker. if the $250,000 would be brought would pass. speed brainer could've brought legislation to the house and it would have passed. host: gcomments by harry reid. the senate is in session today. bill has this point -- from "the national journal" -- the story is available online. "the president will have a strong hand to play over what to do about
the country. it led to california and the governor. >> i am jim salinger. i am teaching c's. it is very interesting when you hear a song, australian or a cannon, the denial is so strong. if you ask why, i might be surprised [indiscernible] and i was teaching a class three weeks ago and we said, come on, you can have leadership from the top. where is the groundswell from underneath? we were in mtv. -- when anti vietnam issues were important. >> are there -- >> that is what i am asking. the graduation for students? are you talking about that tuition and whatever else? there is something all the came out a few months ago. concern about climate change and different age groups. what we found was that they acceptance of climate changes that it is higher and higher than it has ever been among college students. so they don't exemplify them as strangers. when it is difficult to find a job when there are bread and butter issues in the table, it is easy to sedate someone who seems different. maybe the picture changes a bit. when it starts to come home. we have events like hurricane sandy, the wild
and stop this from happening. think about some of the senators were talking about. senator jim demint, a tea party favorite from south carolina, is retiring at the end of his term. he is going to head the heritage foundation. it might be good for him in his new position to be the person to stop the tax increases from going into the fact. -- into effect. is not like he is going to do it. but that is all it takes. guest: there is precedent for it. in the august debt ceiling crisis in 2011, the house approved on well in or unable to act. it was a deal with senator reid and senator mcconnell. it paved the way for the deal that actually lead us to where we are now. not saying that is equality deal, but it was located in the senate before -- a quality deal, but it was located in the senate before. guest: we ended up a fiscal cliff. that was not tax increase. if there is one thing that is important to republicans, it is taxes. this becomes a much more sensitive issue especially in the current environment. the debt ceiling, that is also important to the republican base. host: we are taking yo
with jim rogers of -- >> duke energy? >> duke energy, and then, the one -- the other one in new jersey, the big one, and then the florida light and power and i forget the names, but all these guys say that, if you would give us knowledge of how that carbon price is gonna rise, we can deal with that. we will make the investments so that electricity becomes carbon free over a few decades. they -- but we've got to give them that. if we don't give them that, then they're not gonna do it. as long as they can get away with coal plants as the cheapest energy or now gas as a cheaper -- that's what they will use. so we -- they -- we-- some of them have a heart and they understand this and they have children and grandchildren, too. so they could be our friend, but as long -- but if they're doing -- like the ceo of exxon mobil and like the koch brothers, and if they fund disinformation and actual change in textbooks, that's the thing which i'm over -- between christmas and new year, i have an appointment to talk to legal scholars again because i think we should file suits against those people for
as these four republicans, senators lee, paul, rubio, and shelby. not a boating were senators jim demint, the republican of south carolina. he is retiring. senators kirk and lautenberg as well. here was the reaction from all four house republican leaders. it put this out in a joint statement. here is what they had to say -- the house will honor its commitment to consider the senate agreement if it is passed. decisions about whether the house will seek to a set -- to except or amend the measure will not be made and house members and the american people had been able to review the legislation. the house is expected to come in at noon today. there are some reports that a boat could happen as early as this afternoon. the house minority lindsey -- pine ridge -- house minority leader nancy pelosi tweeted a statement last night about when this bill might come to the house. she had to say, when a final agreement is reached and passed by the senate, i will present it to the house democratic caucus. from "the new york times," -- here is a "-- a quote -- we are getting your take on this. the senate
of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointing fingers, when we went after jim wright, newt was the speaker and jim was forced out of office. they went after newt. the combat became very personal. that is one of the things that started this movement. over time, i think it has become political as well as personal. much more political and personal. >> she said raising cain, are -- -- you said raising cain. you will the gavel for the oversight committee and use that to raise the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and hilary as secretary of state do not like me very much. i was chair of the government oversight committee during the time we were investigating whitewater and we were investigating campaign contributions that came from sources outside the united states and from various people. there was an awful lot to that. we had people testifying like johnny chung, they had contributed money to gain favor with the white house. there were other illegal contribu
and jim was forced out of office. they went after newt. that is one of the things that started this movement. over time, i think it has become political as well as personal. much more political and personal. >> she said raising cain, are -- you will the the gavel for the oversight committee and use that to raise the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and secretary as secretary -- hilary as secretary of state do not like me very much. i was chair of the government oversight committee during the time we were investigating whitewater and we were investigating campaign contributions that came from sources outside the united states and from various people. there was an awful lot to that. we had people testifying like ohnny chonung, they had contributed money to gain favor with the white house. and they came into the kitchen at hong kong and said we wonder -- we like your president and we want to contribute to his campaign. the man who said that was the equivalent
ran for the senate against each other in new york state. the night they were both nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running against professor moynihan. jim buckley is referring to you as professor moynihan. pat said, the mudslinging has begun. what you are in for tonight, however, it is a lecture on political philosophy. take notes, there will be a test. in 1953, the year in which the words "under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which he said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despis
. they put all the bankers in jail and the corrupt politicians, and then they fixed the government. host: jim from montana offering his take. paula curry writes in -- i want to go to manitoba, canada, daniel is waiting to offer his take on the west fiscal cliff negotiations. caller: good morning. i wish a merry christmas and mary new york -- happy new year to all americans, i wish all of them happiness, health, and good things. what i want to say to all the people of america -- at the time of the hostage situation in iran, i worked there until two weeks before that disaster. i was also a victim of that. i was for many months in the hospital. i follow always america everywhere. i appreciate how you people work together and make america number one. host: do you think america's working together right now in this fiscal cliff negotiant that is causing friction in washington? caller: absolutely, it is so beautiful to see. they are doing their best. i am not there in the party, but i want to read about the differences, why america is america, and why not it is not -- why it is not other countries.
from jim in hot springs national park, arkansas. what kind of business do you own? caller: the last one i had, i was in the construction business. and when i sold my last house i decided to move too hot springs, the first resort in america. host: you are a retired business owner? caller: right. host: if you were still running your business, how would you be looking at the fiscal cliff? caller: i've got some ideas i would like to say. the first thing we would do is eliminate all the people that do the free housing and food stamps and by about all those office expenses and just go with an earned income credits that would not exceed 15 cows and dollars per year. -- $15,000.ould that affec it would help reduce the need for taxes, so they would have more money for others things, rather than paying taxes. if the current welfare system pays people as much as $45,000 a year to add up all the benefits, the free medical, with medical,to doctors or hospitals would cause normally $1,500 a month, but an insurance company for a family, and they get about $800 a month for free housing and another $70
-time employees, ben, libya, evan, mike, julie, richard, jennifer, nick, michelle, jim, doory, jesse, angela, kathleen, carolyn, rachel, eric, jennifer, chris, cody, greg, katelyn, stephanie, beth, bennett, nathan , emily, mary, abby, lee, shannon, christina, p.j., alex, nicki, randy, john, the two best veteran constituent service reps you could ever want. sharon, rachel, cara. mr. speaker, all of them were loyal to the district and i read their names into the record to thank them for their service and loyalty to me, with you especially for their service to -- but especially for their service to the district. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brook, for five minutes. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, the bush tax cuts history illuminates why american families face huge tax increases on january 1. the bush tax cuts had two purposes, first, stimulate the economy, create jobs, cut unemployment, and cut the deficit. second, cut taxes to help american families take care of their own needs. in just three years thanks to the bush tax cuts unemployment
. that's the name of the game. and if we can do it on the highway bill, if -- if i could do it with jim inhofe, if debbie stabenow can do it with pat roberts on the farm bill, i know -- and there are other examples i could give. i could give examples of senator feinstein with her republican counterpart. i could give many examples on the appropriations committee. we know we can do this. we just have to take a deep breath and put our ego as side for this country's sake and make those compromise that allow us to still stand tall. now, i'm only five feet so that's hard, but you get the point. we can do this and we should do it now. and if we don't do it now, we should vote on the president's plan because the people of this country deserve better than to be left hanging on a cliff. they don't deserve that. it's not right. thank you very much. i yield the floor. >> next, joe manchin talking about his plan for the fiscal cliff. their diligent work. they have committed themselves to this work and i appreciate it and they keep us all informed. mr. president, i rise today frustrated, embarrassed
that would vote against it because he is a fairly conservative republican. host: he will be replacing jim demint in the senate, who is stepping down. jim demint, one of three that did not vote last night. guest: i do not know if that means he was not here, or he abstained. i imagine he could not have voted to support this. host: donna, independent caller. caller: my concern is that i am basically lost in the cracks. i was a hard worker, paid my taxes, i had an accident, and now i have cancer. i get my medicare, but still i am having to pay for more insurance. my social security check went up, but i have to pay the high price of medical care because of the bills, and it is not fair because i can not get supplemental insurance to help me pay for my disease. i do not think it is fair enough to where i am lost in the crack, and i can barely make it. all of my money goes directly to medical costs. about i'm sorry to hear that, if a tragedy, but she points out the problem. when you go after 2% of the taxpayers and small businesses to fix the problems better on our shoulders, it is picking the w
been going on for years in iowa, my friend, former colleague, jim leech and i had written about that. it's happening in california, in arizona, even a little bit in florida. that is part of the problem. nationally they got more than a million more votes than republicans who ran for the house of representatives. yet they come into this with a 5-vote margin and there are some areas where in north carolina there were more votes for democrats than republicans but there are only 20 -- 27% of the representatives are democrats. it confuses the notion of mandate. the president won decisively, the president picked up ground and we had a million more votes nationwide for the house of representatives. that doesn't sound like much of a national mandate to continue the policies of the republicans over the last decade or so. host: let's go to the republican line, david from ohio. i would love to be able to buy my children ferraris or the president kept on saying he wanted a balanced attack. to this problem. which i agree that you had to increase the revenues, but you also got to address the spendi
some of the senators we're talking about. senator jim demint is retiring at the end of this congress. he will become the head of the very conservative heritage foundation. it might be good for him in his new position to be the person that stopped the tax increase from going to affect, who stopped the senate from voting for a tax increase. i am not saying he will do it, but it just takes one senator to stop this. this is the body we are relying on to get a deal. it is hard to imagine. host: josh gordon? guest: in 2011, a house proved unable or unwilling to act. it was a deal with senator reid and senator mcconnell that paved the way for the deal that led us to where we are now. the deal was located in the senate before the house jumped on. guest: this is a little different. he is right. that is what led to the super committee being formed. that failed. we ended up with the fiscal cliff. that was not a tax increase. one thing important to the republican base is tax increases. this becomes a more sensitive issue in the current environment. the debt ceiling is also important to the repub
changed with in the room. >> jim of cnn sends out this week. -- tweet. how could the senate passed this 89-8 and yet it is so hard to get it done in the house? >> this is not the first time this has happened. there was a payroll tax cut extension. when you are elected, you have voters from all over the state. you have a lot of people with similar views about the world. when you are talking to your base back home, that is the way it works. one house member, a republican, was saying he had to watch out for his own voters more than the electorate in general. >> thank you for holding. you are on the air. >> hello. i want to know why he. i worked at a company for five years. i am unemployed now. i am getting unemployment. hi husband doesn't work. it was a single family income. i want to know and understand how a cameo -- can you try to raise everyone's taxes and make the poor and like me -- and i am struggling to keep my home right now. nobody wants to come to an agreement on the fiscal cliff. >> i saw a report by the washington post that 71% of people will have their taxes raised by this deal?
on, he took on as his target, the speaker jim wright. that was the beginning of the rigid of some of this polarization. there is low -- the beginning of some of this polarization. it was a better time. since those last couple of decades, the institution has suffered from too much partisanship. >> before mr. gingrich, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be
classmates was newt gingrich. early on, he took on as his target, the speaker jim wright. that was the beginning of some of this polarization. it was a better time. -- there is little doubt that in the days of tip o'neill, but it was a better time. since those last couple of decades, the institution has suffered from too much partisanship. >> before mr. gingrich, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to yo
gone up. guest: i guess that's one way to look at it, sure. host: let's go to floral city, florida. jim on the republicans line. caller: good morning. i don't so much have a question but a comment. i feel that most of the conversation in washington is about money and it's more, more, more, more. they're going to waste every dime they get. so the problem i consider is that they have too much money. not that they have too little. they don't need more. if we were to update our computer system we could probably do 60% to 70% of our governmental business on a computer and let the people run it instead of our bureaucrats. it just makes no sense. i've only heard just a very few words regarding the fact that they spend too much money. guest: we do. we spend too much money. and unfortunately you're absolutely right. we don't hear that enough and for that reason that was the reason we got the compromise last night. enough people are willing to look the other way on the spending. again, i understand the folks who voted for it. both democrats and republicans alike. they don't want to go over the cl
for this country. host: we move on to jim in fort myers, fla. caller: thank you for taking my call. what is your suggestions to solve these problems? are you still for the electoral college system? how will you improve the campaign financing? i would like to hear what you thought after all of your research. guest: there are a few different ways to go. i do not advocate a particular policy position, but there are some implications. in terms of fund-raising, it is a result of low contribution limits, with rapidly rising campaign costs. if you favor the public system, you will want to revamp its note it offers a larger pool -- so it offers a larger pool to opt in. that would limit the amount of time presidents have to campaign. you might see the problem is the contribution limit. contribution limits on the amount of money you can give are small relative to the amount of money it takes to run a campaign. you might say to raise the contribution limits. with the electoral college, if it were abolished and we elect our presidents through a national popular vote, you could have a lively debate. voters i
. and if we can do it on the highway bill, if -- if i could do it with jim inhofe, if debbie abenow can do it with pat roberts on the farm bill, i know -- and there are other examples i could give. i could give examples of senator feinstein with her republican counterpart. i could give many examples on the appropriations committee. we know we can do this. we just have to take a deep breath and put our ego as side for this country's sake and make those compromise that allow us to still stand tall. now, i'm only five feet so that's har but you get the point. we can do this and we should do it now. and if we don't do it now, we should vote on the president's plan because the people of this country deserve better than to be left hanging on a cliff. they don't deserve that. it's not right. thank you very much. i yield the floor. >> the measure would phase it in for three years and allow the office of management and budget to pick which programs would be cut rather than the across-the- board cuts, sequestration. diligent work. they have committed themselves to this work and i appreciate it and t
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)